Dear parents, you are being lied to.

Not mine, but deserves the signal boost because a) solid info contained and b) has more links supporting the position than I could ever dream of finding. Vaccinate your kids people, it’s in everyone’s best interests.

Violent metaphors

Standard of care.

In light of recent outbreaks of measles and other vaccine preventable illnesses, and the refusal of anti-vaccination advocates to acknowledge the problem, I thought it was past time for this post.

Dear parents,

You are being lied to. The people who claim to be acting in the best interests of your children are putting their health and even lives at risk.

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Travel Style

The Daily Post posted this writing prompt this morning, and I decided to write something about it.

What’s your travel style? Are you itinerary and schedule driven, needing to have every step mapped out in advance or are you content to arrive without a plan and let happenstance be your guide?

I’m a little of column A and a little of column B when I travel. I don’t like to just head out with absolutely no idea where I’m going or when I want to be there, but I also am loathe to plan out every detail of a trip.

Generally when I travel (not that I’ve travelled much at this stage) I plan a loose itinerary. I figure out where I’m planning to spend the night and if there’s anything I want to make sure I see on the way and go from there.

The result has been some amazing scenic drives and the freedom to stop whenever I saw something neat without feeling a ton of time pressure.

Some days, like when I drove the Cabot trail, stopping every time I wanted to has meant a lot more time on the road than anticipated. But I’ve also met really cool people: the women in Cheticamp who taught me how to rug hook the Acadian way, some buddhist monks, and an historian who happened to know all about the part of Scotland my family originated in.

The flip side is by not planning out every detail of every day when I travel, I probably miss out on a lot of really cool things I might have decided to check out had I done more research and planned more before I left.

The idea of planning every moment stresses me out. I go on vacation to relax and exist outside of my schedule-oriented life. One of the best parts of being on vacation is not having to look at a clock to check that I’m where I’m supposed to be. Taking out my phone to take a picture after my camera battery dies instead of to respond to texts and e-mails from people who all insist they need my attention RIGHT NOW.

Having a schedule works well for me in my every day life. It keeps me from spending the whole day doing nothing, and the self-imposed deadlines get me up and going. My work certainly isn’t adaptable to no schedule right now. Lists and deadlines and meetings are an important part of it and when I adhere to the day’s itinerary I do better at the job.

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The Return of the Prodigal Daughter

One of the things I really enjoyed doing while I was writing for The Aquinian at STU was my bi-weekly column, Prodigal Daughter. It was initially meant to be an opinion column on current affairs in the Church, but it turned in to a sort of reverse catechesis for me.

Writing that column encouraged me to spend more time learning what the Church actually teaches about some things and really thinking about whether or not I agreed with the doctrine. I tied in what I was learning to current affairs as intended, but in the process of writing the column I found I became a lot more comfortable sharing my own faith journey and addressing the people I know within the Church with the concerns raised by those who feel themselves to be outside it.

My column became a bridge of sorts between secular and religious life, and a conversation starter.

I miss writing it.

So, I’ve decided to bring it back as a regular Wednesday feature on this blog, starting next Wednesday.

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Patient pleads New Brunswick for potentially life-saving treatment

Annette Sebey isn’t asking for the moon, just her life. In a tearful plea at a press conference Monday afternoon, Sebey asked the New Brunswick government why they were able to decide whether she lives or dies.

Sebey, 46, is a mother of two and suffers from late-onset Pompe. Pompe is a rare genetic mutation which prevents the body from producing one of the enzymes needed to convert glycogen into sugar. Glycogen is the stored form of the energy people get from eating and is normally stored in the liver and muscles until it is needed.

“Five years ago I could shop on my own. I could climb stairs although slowly. I could get out of low chairs. I did not use a cane” said Sebey.

Because her body is no longer able to convert glycogen stores into usable energy, Sebey can no longer attend her children’s activities or be easily involved in what used to be a rich, active family and social life.

The only treatment available for Pompe, which affects about one in every 40 thousand people, is an expensive enzyme replacement therapy called Myozyme.

According to Durhane Wong-Rieger, the president of the Canadian Association for Rare Disorders, in the world of drugs for rare diseases, it’s not the most expensive one out there.

“Despite the fact that individually these drugs are very expensive, the numbers are very small. In Canada, the amount of money we pay for drugs for rare diseases is 0.7 per cent of the public health spending” said Wong-Rieger.

She did not have an exact figure for the cost of the drug, but said drugs for rare diseases generally cost between 100 thousand and 600 thousand dollars per person per year.

In New Brunswick, Myozyme is not covered for adults because it did not pass the review process of the Canadian Expert Drug Advisory Committee. The drug is covered for people diagnosed with infantile-onset Pompe disease.

In a statement, Minister Hugh Fleming said “there was insufficient evidence to evaluate Myozyme’s effectiveness and safety in late-onset Pompe disease, therefore it was not recommended for coverage for this form of the disease. The manufacturer may make a re-submission with new information and Myozyme’s benefit status can be re-considered.”

Sebey said requiring the manufacturer to resubmit the drug with evidence proving efficacy in adults is akin to a death sentence.

“Certainly rare diseases can present unspeakable hardships for the families affected by them and our hearts go out to anyone in this situation.  While prescription drugs can be beneficial, their use must be evidence-based” said Fleming.

In March of this year, a study of 283 adult Pompe patients showed enzyme replacement therapy has a positive impact on reducing mortality.

Sebey and Wong-Rieger said the Canadian Drug Review process does not work for drugs for rare diseases because the clinical trials are done with small patient groups, usually over short periods of time because of the severity of the illnesses.

“We understand the challenges of public drug plans to provide coverage for all its patients. Luckily most provinces have found ways of treating patients with rare diseases, and by using individualized treatment plans, the healthcare system can be sure that the patients who stay on therapy are those who are benefiting” said Wong-Rieger.

Brad Crittenden is from British Columbia and also lives with late-onset Pompe.

“I hated buying groceries. I would only have the energy to go to one store. I couldn’t go to a store unless they had shopping carts. I couldn’t carry the groceries, but mostly it was because it helped me walk. I really couldn’t walk without pushing the grocery cart around. The worst part of it was when I got home and I tried to carry the groceries into my home” said Crittenden.

Three and a half years ago, Crittenden talked to his respirologist about how much longer it would be before he would need to be vented. Venting is when a hole is cut in the throat and a tube inserted which connects the lungs with a ventilator. Once a person has been vented, they are confined to a wheelchair because they need to keep the equipment with them in order to breathe.

Crittenden was told he would need to be vented within two years. At that point, he was already at a quarter lung capacity when lying down and half capacity when sitting.

Then he started receiving Myozyme.

“The biggest thing that it did was it stopped the progression of the disease” said Crittenden.

Crittenden has been receiving bi-weekly infusions since May 2010. Since he started the treatment, his lung capacity has doubled.

“They [his family doctor] would always try to get me to do squats. Well you can imagine when you can’t breathe you can’t really do squats. Now when I go in to the office my doctor does the squats with me. We do maybe 30 or 40 squats” said Crittenden.

Crittenden has been able to start playing some of the sports he was forced to drop, and has not had to be vented. He continues to walk without a wheelchair or a walker.

“Personally, I find it quite offensive that a patient who’s sick has to sit here and beg for an approved treatment that will save her life. … When there’s other people all over the world, especially in Canada that are getting it” said Crittenden.

New Brunswick will continue to work with other provinces and territories to develop an evaluation process for drugs for rare diseases said Fleming.

In other provinces, Myozyme is approved for use in late-onset Pompe patients.

“I can only assume that the Minister and the Alward government has decided to measure the value of my life in dollars and cents” said Sebey.

She wants the New Brunswick government to develop an individualized plan for her case and allow her to receive Myozyme. If she does not benefit from the drug, she says they should stop coverage.

Annette Sebey and family
Photo credit: Meredith Gillis

In the meantime, Sebey is enrolled in the second phase of a clinical trial for another enzyme replacement therapy being tested in the United States. The company making the drug flies her from her home in Perth-Andover to Florida and then drives her five hours to the trial site every two weeks for her infusion.

“The drug company is paying for everything, but they’re not replacing the time away from my family” said Sebey.

She also said any benefits she may be receiving from the clinical trial are likely negated by the exhaustion of travelling so far so frequently.

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Fredericton Playhouse needs renovation or replacement

This article was originally written for KHJ and published here on their website.

Photo courtesy of The Playhouse.

Photo courtesy of The Playhouse.

Fredericton’s fanciest venue for live theatre needs what could be a multi-million dollar makeover.

Tim Yerxa is the executive director of The Playhouse, and he said it’s at the end of its useful life. Last year, the cost of maintaining the building was 400 thousand dollars.

Yerxa said it’s hard for people to understand what’s wrong with the building when they come for performances.

“Because it’s not something you can see, it’s really the guts of the building that are the problem” said Yerxa.

He said the building is structurally sound and perfectly safe, but the costs of keeping it that way are only going to go up.

Yerxa didn’t have an estimate of what it would cost to renovate the inside and keep the exisiting building, but he said the last consultant’s report concluded it would be more economical to simply replace the entire building.

“We understand and appreciate the importance of the Playhouse, what it brings to the community. We do have, and we have to work this out collectively, we have an issue” said Brad Woodside.

That issue is the amount of debt the city is able to take on to finance projects. There is a policy of debt reduction and an eight per cent limit in place which the city is not able to exceed.

“There’s a number of major projects that are out there and people are starting to make representations. I think it’s only fair to let the community know that we’re looking at 2016 and after that date before we’re in a position to really tackle major projects which would be in the millions of dollars” said Woodside.

Councillor Dan Keenan encouraged the board of directors to approach the surrounding communities with the report and the need for infrastructure renewal since people who attend the events at The Playhouse aren’t just from Fredericton.

He also asked about the possibility running more summer programming as a tourist attraction to increase revenues.

Revenues from ticket sales made up 58 per cent of The Playhouse’s 2.2 million dollar budget last year. Thirty per cent of funding was from the City of Fredericton, nine per cent from grants, and three per cent from donations.

“It’s very difficult when you want to spend that money on programming rather than trying to keep the building up” said Bruce Grandy.

Maintenance of The Playhouse facilities was 18 per cent of the budget last year. Twenty-five per cent was spent on operations, 42 per cent on programming, and 15 per cent on administration.

Patrick Flanagan is the president of The Playhouse Board of the Directors.

“It is a bit of getting over the shock, and coming to believe that this place really needs something major and trying to figure out how they’re going to do it” said Flanagan.

Councillor Kate Rogers said council is very aware of the timing of 2016 or 2017 for the money to be available, but she is pleased to see the board doing so much of the ground work in the years leading up to that.

“It takes courage and it takes commitment to think that far ahead” she said.

“To be putting this type of energy three years before that is a great commitment from the board and if the board wasn’t doing it noone else would and it’s work that needs to be done” said Rogers.

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